Research

New Vaccine Blocks COVID-19 and Variants, Plus Other Coronaviruses Illustration of COVID-19 virus jcc41@duke.edu Thu, 06/03/2021 - 17:26

A potential new vaccine developed by members of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute has proven effective in protecting monkeys and mice from a variety of coronavirus infections — including SARS-CoV-2 as well as the original SARS-CoV-1 and related bat coronaviruses that could potentially cause the next pandemic. The findings were published in the journal Nature.

Duke Enrolls First-in-Nation Children for Pfizer-BioNTech U.S. Clinical Study Trial in Children Under 12 Child receiving COVID-19 vaccination jcc41@duke.edu Thu, 06/03/2021 - 17:15

Twin 9-year-old girls at Duke Health became the first in the United States to participate in a Pfizer and BioNTech Phase 1 study to evaluate safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in preventing COVID-19 among healthy children below the age of 12.

Duke University School of Nursing Research on Brain Injuries Tolu O. Oyesanya, PhD, RN and Karin Reuter-Rice, PhD, CPNP-AC, FCCM, FAAN jcc41@duke.edu Thu, 06/03/2021 - 17:04

More than 5.3 million individuals — children and adults — permanently live with a brain injury-related disability, according to the Brain Injury Association of America. Two researchers from the Duke University School of Nursing, Tolu O. Oyesanya, PhD, RN, and  Karin Reuter-Rice, PhD, CPNP-AC, FCCM, FAAN, have devoted an aspect of their research toward better understanding the ramifications that brain injuries inflict on patients and their loved ones and how to give them the best health care possible.

Heather Whitson, MD, with patient

What if we could disable the defense mechanisms that enable cancer cells to evade treatment, or even control their genes to prevent them from developing into tumors in the first place? Can we enhance our brain’s ability to forestall damage from Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions? Is it possible to develop a vaccine for everything?

Cara O’Brien, MD

With sepsis, time is of the essence. Left untreated, the illness—a runaway immune response to infection—can quickly become life-threatening. Duke hospital medicine physician Cara O’Brien, MD, is partnering with the Duke Institute for Health Innovation to lead a multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, and biostatisticians that is using data science to rapidly identify at-risk patients, speed treatment, and improve outcomes.

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